Best time to go to New Zealand?

You know, it’s going to be great whenever you come to New Zealand, and people will travel here for different reasons. So if you’re coming here to ski, you probably don’t need our advice! Although… for what it’s worth, September is better than July!

That said, this is a question we’re asked A LOT, so we decided to come up with six compelling reasons to travel here at certain times of the year. And the good news is, these periods all fall outside of peak season!

Autumn Colours

New Zealand is green. There’s no two ways about it. You can’t really go anywhere without being confronted with rolling green hills and vast swathes of native forest. Even the waters of the Marlborough Sounds have a stunning emerald green colour. But we’ll not be accused of being so one dimensional! No. Not even when it comes to the colour of our landscape. In addition to the widespread green we enjoy here, there are a couple of areas you can take in shades of orange during our Fall months – Central Otago and Queenstown Lakes District and the McKenzie Country near Aoraki Mount Cook National Park.Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Visit New Zealand
Autumn colours in Arrowtown – possibly one of New Zealand’s best Fall season locations

Cheapest Flights

Contrary to popular belief, New Zealand has more than one international airport. While Auckland airport takes care of most of our international arrivals and departures, there are six other international gateways. Most of which are no larger than the baggage claim area of LAX, but we only like to be grandiose and go over the top when it comes to things like scenery, our rugby team, and hospitality. Other international airports include: Wellington, Rotorua, Queenstown, Christchurch, Dunedin and uncle Bob’s farm shed on the West Coast.

Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Come To New Zealand
Ok, so it’s not an international flight. But the good news is, this flight is free! As part of your ‘Tui’ wilderness experience

Lambing Season

Spring is a great time to be in New Zealand. Every August to October, the 40 million sheep in New Zealand multiply and become quite a few more (sorry – we can’t find the stats on this one). Our green landscape becomes dotted with tiny white lambs figuring out how to walk and follow their mother around the paddock. They’re also dropped in the deep end, so to speak, figuring out how to avoid ending up on the dining room table come Christmas time (roast lamb is especially popular as Christmas dinner in New Zealand). So if you want to see new born lambs before they’re part of the December menu, you’re best to visit in our Spring time.

Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Visit New Zealand
A quintessential photo of New Zealand rural life – taken from Braemar Station, looking directly at Aoraki Mt Cook

Southern Lights

The northern hemisphere has the Aurora Borealis (the Northern Lights) and we have the Aurora Australis (the Southern Lights). Whilst the best time to get a view of this phenomenon (caused by the collision of gaseous particles in the atmosphere) in New Zealand is during our winter months, you should know that we’re actively lobbying Wikipedia to have the “Australis’ removed from the name. Just like all great New Zealand phenomena, Australia tries to steal the limelight. Not these lights though – they’re all our own!

If you’re keen to learn more, we recently bestowed our South Island wisdom on Expedia for their article, ‘Chasing the Southern Lights in New Zealand’, to help those who have taken up the quest of chasing the Southern Lights.

Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Come To New Zealand
One of our Active coaches steeling the lime light on this occasion, on a stary night in the South Island

Rich Marine Life

With over 9,400 miles of coastline, there’re a few fish here. With a small population, strict commercial fishing rules and marine environment protections in place, it’s fair to say there’s an abundance of marine life. No more so than in places like the Bay of Islands, Kaikoura and Milford Sound. During our summer months you’d be hard pressed not to encounter some sort of fish, sea lion or dolphin while exploring our coastline.

Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Come To New Zealand
The marine life in the Poor Knights Islands is incredible, whether you’re snorkelling or diving

Penguin Hotspots

Most people only associate penguins with Antarctica, but New Zealand is home to three penguin species – The Yellow-eyed penguin (hoiho), Fiordland crested penguin (tawaki) and the Little penguin (korora). You’ll find penguins in greater numbers in the South Island from August to February. Take note, seeing a penguin in New Zealand still makes you hear Morgan Freeman’s voice in your head. It’s unavoidable but who doesn’t like Morgan Freeman?

Best Time To Go To New Zealand

Best Time To Come To New Zealand
A yellow eyed penguin, found along parts of the East Coast of the South Island. Cute eh!

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5 Adventurous Facts About Milford Sound

Milford Sound is without a doubt one of New Zealand’s most iconic destinations. When you’re dreaming about your trip, everything’s perfect. You see sunny blue skies, snow capped peaks, perfect photographs and a peaceful elegance… and you blind yourself to the possibility of unpredictable weather.

But Milford holds a few secrets that only a local will tell you, secrets that will inspire your sense of adventure.

1. Milford Sound is known as the wettest inhabited place in New Zealand.

With an average of almost 7,000mm of rainfall across 183 days of the year, I wouldn’t rely on getting a tan in Milford Sound. But don’t worry – something incredible happens when it rains…

Kayaking Milford Sound
Kayakers exploring the misty Milford Sound

2. Don’t worry about the weather, the perfect day is rain.

Sure, sunny blue skies are nice for keeping the camera dry, but the true explorer will pray for rain. The enormous granite peaks don’t absorb a drop of water and they have no beaches. The result is thousands of stunning waterfalls flowing straight into the fiord.

Kayaking Milford Sound Waterfall
Front row seats to a spectacular waterfall

3. The ocean is black.

The fiord is hundreds of meters deep, but the rainfall creates a layer of fresh water up to 6 meters deep, which sits on top of the ocean. All this rainfall washes a tannin from the forest, which stains the fresh water, resulting in its unique black appearance.

Kayaking Milford Sound
The deep, black, moody waters of Milford Sound

4. Milford Sound is NOT the Milford Track.

This is one of the most misunderstood facts about Milford. Milford Sound itself was regarded as the 8th Wonder of the World by Rudyard Kipling, it’s a fiord that’s surrounded by towering peaks, lush rainforest and incredible marine life.

The Milford Track is one of New Zealand’s Great Walks, and a very different experience to visiting Milford Sound. The hike is absolutely stunning, but the local government allows 90 people on the track each day (50 guided, 40 unguided), so it can get a little crowded. Plus you can only hike it for 6 months of the year, whereas Milford Sound itself is accessible year-round.

Wouldn’t you rather wake up in Milford, sea kayak on the misty fiord as the sun rises, then venture off on a stunning bush hike that’s hidden from the crowds of tourists? I know I would.

The Milford Track
The mountains leading into Milford Sound

5. Save your time researching accommodation, there’s only one place to stay!

Flanked by the Darran Mountains, the Milford Lodge is 2 kilometres from the head of the fiord and it’s the only accommodation available in Milford Sound. If you’d like to splash out, upgrade to the luxury riverside chalets… you won’t be disappointed.

The Milford Lodge
Milford Lodge – Photo Credit @LarssonPhotography